Students aren’t mediocre, assembly-line widgets

students

Teachers, have you ever felt frustrated and ill-equipped to meet the needs of the students in your classroom as well as the dictates of those who have never been classroom teachers? Sometimes, we teachers feel like there is too much to do and not enough time or resources to do what needs to be done well.

Standardized testing frenzy, No Child Left Behind, Common Core Curriculum, STEM curriculum, professional development relegated to one day make ‘n’ take or lecture sessions, and demands from school boards, legislators, and the business community all may contribute to teacher frustration, burnout, and being ROJ (Retired On the Job).

Our responsibilities

How can we feel more professional and less like factory workers producing widgets?

First, we must clarify our mission. Students are not widgets. There can be no reject bins for human beings with different needs and varied learning intelligence!

Secondly, we must reach our students before we can teach them. By reach I mean to be willing to acknowledge cultural and personal idiosyncrasies and to be friendly, fair, and flexible. Not everyone learns – or teaches – the same way.

Being friendly involves knowing our students’ names and greeting them as they enter our classrooms.  It also involves dressing professionally as a means of demonstrating personal and student respect.

Be professional

There are three B’s no student should ever see on a teacher: no bosoms, no belly buttons, and no backsides. Students need a professional appearance. They form their own perceptions the first time they meet us, and we do not get a second chance to make a good first impression.

The culture of our classroom community must be one of acceptance, rigor, and high standards, for our students will either stretch or stagnate according to our expectations of them. Teachers must not only have a lesson plan A and a backup plan B, but also a backup for the backup to take advantage of any teachable moment.

If we do not have a plan for our students, they will most certainly have plans for us! Their plans will make our lives miserable and learning and teaching almost impossible.

Fairness involves demanding standards for which everyone is held accountable. Rules must be observed. No ridicule, bullying, disrespect or disparaging of anyone’s personal appearance, answers, questions, or opinions. Teachers must take control of our classrooms from the first day until the last.

It’s not easy

We must acknowledge that our calling is a combination of science, art, and craft. TEACHING IS PLAIN HARD WORK!  

Our diverse students are real human beings with real needs and varied skills and talents. We must take the challenge of our profession and equip ourselves with the content knowledge and the pedagogy skills in order to deliver what our students must have. As we teach, we must also remember that these same students may have to serve us or to teach our children or grandchildren at some point after they leave us.

As teachers serving humans, we cannot allow them or ourselves to be treated any way except as we would want our own children and family members to be treated. We must be actively vocal as we present ourselves as advocates for the teaching and learning process.


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