Chicago suburb cites Florida murders to justify assault weapons ban

BY STEVE SADIN

BY STEVE SADIN
PIONEER PRESS /TNS

CHICAGO – Owners of assault weapons living in the northern Chicago suburb of Deerfield have until June 13 to remove the firearms from within village limits or face daily fines after a ban was approved Monday night.

The rationale for the law mentions four recent shooting (Florida murders) acidents that have claimed a total of 150 lives: The shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 dead; a massacre at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas that killed 26 people; the Las Vegas music festival shooting that left 58 dead and the Pulse Nightclub mass shooting in Orlando that killed 49 people.

Magazines included 
The Village Board of Trustees unanimously approved a ban on certain types of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, amending a 2013 ordinance that regulated the storage of those items.

The new ordinance prohibits the possession, sale and manufacturing of certain types of assault weapons and large capacity magazines within the village, according to the ordinance.

Violations carry a fine of between $250 and $1,000 per day, according to Matthew Rose, the village attorney. He said the fine is levied each day until there is compliance.

‘Held constitutional’
In the ordinance, the definition of an assault weapon includes, among others, semiautomatic rifles that have a fixed magazine with a capacity to accept more than 10 rounds of ammunition; shotguns with a revolving cylinder; and semiautomatic pistols and rifles that can accept large-capacity magazines and possess one of a list of other features. Among the dozens of specific models cited are the AR-15, AK 47 and Uzi, according to the ordinance.

Street said the new law is modeled after one approved by Highland Park in 2013. That ban survived a legal challenge by one of the city’s residents and the Illinois State Rifle Association. The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that legislation constitutional and the U.S. Supreme Court let the decision stand when it declined to take up the appeal.

“This is not only held constitutional by the 7th Circuit but similar laws have been ruled constitutional in California, the District of Columbia and Maryland,” Rose said last month.

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